Tag: Food

Eating Habits

For May – I found that I wanted to become less self-confined and eat at least one main meal at the kitchen table (with or without others).

This has been a hard habit to break and although I started off well and was eating 2 meals a day in my shared kitchen, I have since reduced it to 1 meal a day.

I have a sense of disappointment in myself for not sitting at the table. What difference does it make if I sit at the kitchen table or the desk in my room…? My anxiety says it makes a big difference.

This month I remind myself that even small changes make a difference and that I am still eating in the shared kitchen – even if it is only briefly.

 

Almost halfway through the year now. Crazy how that happens!

I Guess This Is What I Am Doing This Month

April was meant to be my ‘drink more water and cut down on chocolate’ month…

I started off relatively well, I was drinking more water than I have ever known myself drink. I also managed to cut down on my chocolate intake to 1 bar every other day instead of 2+ bars a day (small bars).

Then Easter break happened and I came back to my mum’s. The cupboards are full of treats and so much food that I have had to stuff myself full of it to make sure it gets eaten before it starts growing its own organisms.

I have not been drinking water, instead, I have just been drinking tea.

(Still not buying carbonated drinks though!)

I have had 3 small diet Pepsi’s since February and that has only been due to me socialising at the local bars/pubs.

However, surprisingly, what I have not had this month, (at all) is… crisps. Something I was eating 2 bags of a day most days. My cupboard at my mums is stocked with 2 big variety packs of crisps – they remain untouched. I guess this is what I am doing this month!

 

Now, what about next month?

 

Trees

It is 1998, the house is warm – it smells like homemade pastries. Across the room, a family is gathered.
2 ft tall, green branches reach out.
“Do you want to place these chocolates on, sweetheart?” She asks with a soft smile.
They sit on the floor giving careful consideration of what gets placed where.

It is 2000, the house is happy – four friends sit together laughing. A knock on the door and a child joins them.
5 ft tall, green branches face the room.
“My mum says she can’t make it, the rabbit is sick.”  He tells the tree.
Confused looks are exchanged between friends, bafflement that will continue for many years.

It is 2017, the house is cosy – a family enjoy the peace. Love and laughter in their eyes as they observe their boy.
2 ft tall, green branches mock the cat.
“Don’t you dare!” She says, swooping him up with a ‘boop’ on the nose.
Content purrs surround the quiet room.

It is 2018, the house is silent.
5 ft tall, fibre optic lights brighten the room.

 

 

My Experience with Coeliac Disease

Coeliac disease is caused by an abnormal immune system reaction to the protein gluten, which is found in foods such as bread, pasta, cereals and biscuits. 

Some people with coeliac disease may find that eating oats can trigger symptoms. This is because some oats may be contaminated by other grains during production.

Coeliac disease is usually treated by simply excluding foods that contain gluten from your diet.

If you have coeliac disease, you can eat the following foods, which naturally don’t contain gluten:

  • Most dairy products, such as cheese, butter and milk
  • Fruit and vegetables
  • Meat and fish (although not breaded or battered)
  • Potatoes
  • Rice and rice noodles
  • Gluten-free flours, including rice, corn, soy and potato

By law, food labelled as gluten free can contain no more than 20 parts per million (ppm) of gluten.

In some people, coeliac disease can cause the spleen to work less effectively, making you more vulnerable to infection. 

Malabsorption (where your body doesn’t fully absorb nutrients) can lead to a deficiency of certain vitamins and minerals. Leading to osteoporosis – a condition where your bones become brittle and weak. 

If you have coeliac disease, you’re more likely to also develop lactose intolerance, where your body lacks the enzyme to digest the milk sugar (lactose) found in dairy products.

Symptoms of Coeliac Disease: 

  • Abdominal pain
  • Bloating and flatulence (passing wind)
  • Indigestion
  • Constipation
  • Fatigue (extreme tiredness)
  • Unexpected weight loss
  • An itchy rash (Although not a symptom of coeliac disease, if you have an autoimmune response to gluten, you may develop a type of skin rash called dermatitis herpetiformis. The rash is itchy and has blisters that burst when scratched. It usually occurs on your elbows, knees and buttocks, although it can appear anywhere on your body)
  • Malnutrition (If coeliac disease isn’t treated, not being able to digest food in the normal way could cause you to become malnourished, leading to tiredness and a lack of energy)

 

There are other symptoms, complications, side effects and treatments – the above mentioned is my own personal experience with this disease. It has not been a fun process and after 8 years, I still have people look at me as though it is a lifestyle choice.

It is not. 

( https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/coeliac-disease/complications/ )