Tag: Medical

Learning Something New

Today, within my University lecture I learnt something new – kind of the point, I know… but still…

In my Law and Policy lecture this morning, we discussed all things law related and we were pointed in the direction of a case involving the Mental Health Act and the Human Rights Act. No other information was given other than the name of the case (Bournewood Case).

As my interest in mental health is quite a healthy one, I immediately noted it down and made a mental plan to go and look at it when I had chance.

I now have a 3 hour break (11.00 – 14.00) and find myself in the library getting a laptop out on loan to look at what I can find.

As someone who has spent years working with individuals with various learning disabilities and conditions, I find it horrifying to read that a person with autism could have ever been detained under the Mental Health Act ‘informally’. Surely the aim of being sectioned under the Mental Health Act is that it is the last resort and only done as a way of providing treatment and ensuring that the person is in a safe environment to heal and recover…

(Though I have never been detained or sectioned – my own experiences assure me that the system is not a kind one and that my view that people should be made to feel safe and secure may not be the case)

 

“They engaged a solicitor on his behalf and took a case for unlawful detention to the High Court, which ruled against him. The Appeal Court overturned the decision in October 1997, and the hospital chose to section HL, although he did not meet the criteria, and in December that year he was finally discharged by the hospital managers…”

“In 1998, the House of Lords overturned the ruling that HL’s detention had been illegal…”

“Mr and Mrs E decided to take the case to the European Court of Human Rights, which in October 2004 ruled in HL’s favour. As a result the government introduced the new Deprivation of Liberty Safeguards, which came into force in April 2009…”

This case changed the law (in Britain) – thankfully, although I find it incredibly disheartening that change came from such trauma. As is usually the case.

I recommend reading about it (Bournewood Case), if you haven’t already.

 

 

Dementia’s

There is no good news where this illness is concerned.
I often wonder if there are people who have as little information as I, who are too scared to Google but still want to know.
I have spent some time today looking through a reliable website, gathering the basics.

For the me from a decade ago, here you are. There is no good news, there is no preparation – there is only ever this day.
One day at a time, my love. Just one day at a time.

http://www.alzheimersresearchuk.org/about-dementia/types-of-dementia/ 

You can have more than one type of Dementia at a time (mixed Dementia).
Alzheimer’s
The most common – usually develops over several years. Some of the early symptoms may include;

  1. Trouble remembering recent events, familiar faces and names
  2. Frequently asking the same question repeatedly
  3. Misplacing items or putting them in an odd place
  4. Being uncertain about the date and time
  5. Being unsure of where they are and getting lost
  6. Not being able to find the right words
  7. Having a low mood, feeling anxious and irritable. Losing interest and self confidence

Symptoms later on may include;

  1. A larger decline in remembering things and having trouble making decisions
  2. Communication and language skills become worse
  3. Trouble recognising household appliances and familiar faces
  4. Day to day routines get harder to complete
  5. Changes to sleep patterns
  6. Possible hallucinations
  7. May become unsteady on their feet

Vascular Dementia
The second most common type of Dementia – caused when blood flow to the brain is restricted. Possibly by a stroke or several miniature strokes over time. Symptoms may include;

  1. Trouble with their thinking skills – struggling to process information, planning, reasoning and poor attention skills
  2. Personality changes – depression, perhaps becoming more emotional than ‘normal’ and becoming less interested in things
  3. Problems with their movements
  4. Bladder problems – most common in the elderly

In later stages, people may need help with eating, dressing and toileting.

Dementia with Lewy Bodies
This type of Dementia is caused by small round clumps of protein building up into nerve cells in the brain. Some of the symptoms can also be found in Parkinson’s Dementia. Symptoms can include;

  1. Change in alertness, attention, confusion
  2. Change in behaviour, very unpredictable and can change from hour to hour
  3. Slow movements, muscle stiffness, tremors
  4. Frequent visual hallucinations that are very well formed and realistic.
  5. Sleep disturbances
  6. Fainting, unsteadiness and possible higher risk for falls

In later stages people may need help with dressing, eating, moving and toileting.

http://www.alzheimersresearchuk.org/about-dementia/types-of-dementia/